Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) accounts for approximately half of all nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) procedures1

The precise incidence of CSCC is difficult to pinpoint due to the exclusion of NMSC from cancer registries.2,3

Annual US incidence of
CSCC is estimated to be1,2,4,5:


700,000a
and rising
a As of 2012.
Men are affected 3 times more often than
women, and the disease tends to occur
more frequently in elderly patients.2,6

CSCC incidence has been reported to have increased by 50% to 200% over the past 30 years.2

Due to increased UV exposure, CSCC incidence is greater in the southern half of the US (UV sun zone 2), where the number of deaths from CSCC may exceed that of melanoma and other common cancer types.2

 

CSCC, basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are distinct tumor types with unique characteristics

CSCC1,2,4,6-12
Anatomical presentation Cutaneous, typically in sun-exposed areas Cutaneous, typically in sun-exposed areas Mucosal linings of oral cavity and aerodigestive tract
Cellular origin Squamous cells Basal cells >90% arises from squamous cells
Incidence Estimated ≈700,000a patients annually in the US
a As of 2012.
Estimated ≈2 million patients annually in the US Estimated 63,000 patients annually in the US
Etiology Chronic UV exposure, genetic syndromes such as albinism and xeroderma pigmentosum, settings of immunosuppression

Additional genetic mutations may be caused by exposure to tobacco, human papillomavirus, arsenic, industrial chemicals, or gasoline
Chronic UV exposure, radiation treatment for other conditions, genetic syndromes such as albinism and xeroderma pigmentosum, settings of immunosuppression

Additional genetic mutations may be caused by exposure to tobacco, human papillomavirus, arsenic, industrial chemicals, or gasoline
Alcohol and tobacco, human papillomavirus
Metastatic rate Rare, but significantly more frequent than BCC; ≈2%-4% of cases Approximately 0.05% of patients ≈60% of patients present with moderately advanced (regional stage) or metastatic disease at diagnosis
Mortality Overall, ≥90% 5-year survival; annual CSCC mortality in the US is approximately 7,000, or 1% of the CSCC annual incidence Up to 99% 5-year survival 64.5% 5-year survival

CSCC prognosis varies considerably based on disease stage

While most early-stage CSCC is curable with complete surgical excision and/or radiation, certain factors increase the likelihood of recurrence and metastasis.6,20‑22

Identify risk factors associated with disease progression

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